The Community Land Trust Network is the official charity supporting Community Land Trusts (CLTs) in England and Wales. We work on behalf of CLTs and, in turn, our members shape and govern our work. It provides funding, resources, training and advice for CLTs and works with the Government, local authorities, lenders and funders to establish the best conditions for CLTs to grow and flourish. Its aim is to transform the land and housing markets in England and Wales so that CLTs are mainstream, not dependent on short-lived specialist support programmes. The Network is also part of a broad alliance of organisations promoting and supporting community led housing in England 

How it shows

Getting organised; A community land trust is a nonprofit corporation that holds land on behalf of a place-based community, while serving as the long-term steward for affordable housing, community gardens, civic buildings, commercial spaces and other community assets on behalf of a community 

Help and resources; CLTs ensure that housing remains genuinely affordable, based on what people actually earn in their area, not just for now but for every future occupier.

Characteristics

Good process; to a point because the asset is held in trust, criticism is based on whether the model can scale up and how mush it puts residents in democratic control. The charity appears to have a conventional management structure.

Caveats

https://www.jacobinmag.com/2019/07/community-land-trusts-clts-problems

The Jacobin article from a US perspective criticises CLTs for not providing bottom up control by residents. From a holistic political economy perspective this is a shortfall but nevertheless the CLTs do address a real need.

https://neweconomics.org/2018/09/whats-the-point-of-community-land-trusts

The article from the New Economic Foundation points to other examples of community housing projects which "can provide a model for more holistic, meaningful and impactful housing policy. What’s more, through giving community consultation an integral role in planning, they also show the necessity of elevating the voices of community residents. In the wake of the Grenfell fire tragedy, where community voices were criminally devalued, moves like these towards greater democracy in the housing and planning sector are urgently needed."